May 202014
 

Visual Studio Online has a relatively new feature called Application Insights. It’s currently in preview, but it already has lots of nice features for gaining insights into what is going on with your web app (or Windows Phone app or Azure web site).

I’m planning to do a few blog posts on this subject. This first part is about installing the monitoring agent and getting the first Application Insights information from my apps to the Application Insights portal.

In my current main project, we have a lot of WCF services hosted with my company’s hosting branch. We don’t have a lot of information about the service health and their use, other than what monitoring services we have built ourselves. Since that is not our main business, we decided to use a third-party service to monitor those things.

We have evaluated a few options, and decided to go further with VS Application Insights, as it seemed to be enough for our needs – and while we evaluate, its free. I guess it will come at a cost when it gets out of preview.

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Apr 022014
 

We have a .net library that communicates with a web service over a “REST-like” interface. To send data to the interface, we need to PUT or POST XML data.

The library is a few years old and uses the WCF REST implementation that existed before it became a part of the .net framework. It was called the WCF REST Starter Kit, and has since been superceeded by built-in classes, but it works, and we haven’t had the inclination or time to change code that works.

The communications library was originally used by a server-side Windows Service which was only used by a few users at a time, and its PUT or POST operations are rarely used.

Recently, we started to use the communication library in a new project where it is used in a multi-tenant server with many simultaneous users, and its PUT and POST operations are called much more often. This new usage made a memory leak much more significant than before.

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