rasmusw

May 272014
 

In my last two posts, I described installing the Microsoft Monitoring Agent and how to enable Visual Studio Application Insights for a web application.

It seems like a lot of work, and as yet you haven’t seen what you gain by installing the agent on your web server and adding a strange configuration file to your web application. You might wonder why you should do all of that.

This is why:

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May 272014
 

In my last blog post, I talked about installing the Visual Studio Application Insights monitoring agent.

That’s all very nice. But you don’t actually gain much by just installing the agent. You need to tell it what to monitor. This post describes how to do that.

If you have web applications running in IIS, and you want to monitor their performance, you are pretty much all set by simply installing the monitoring agent, and adding a single config file to your project. The config file ApplicationInsights.config lets the monitoring agent know that you want this web application monitored, and it allows you to configure some settings about what you want monitored.

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May 202014
 

Visual Studio Online has a relatively new feature called Application Insights. It’s currently in preview, but it already has lots of nice features for gaining insights into what is going on with your web app (or Windows Phone app or Azure web site).

I’m planning to do a few blog posts on this subject. This first part is about installing the monitoring agent and getting the first Application Insights information from my apps to the Application Insights portal.

In my current main project, we have a lot of WCF services hosted with my company’s hosting branch. We don’t have a lot of information about the service health and their use, other than what monitoring services we have built ourselves. Since that is not our main business, we decided to use a third-party service to monitor those things.

We have evaluated a few options, and decided to go further with VS Application Insights, as it seemed to be enough for our needs – and while we evaluate, its free. I guess it will come at a cost when it gets out of preview.

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Apr 022014
 

We have a .net library that communicates with a web service over a “REST-like” interface. To send data to the interface, we need to PUT or POST XML data.

The library is a few years old and uses the WCF REST implementation that existed before it became a part of the .net framework. It was called the WCF REST Starter Kit, and has since been superceeded by built-in classes, but it works, and we haven’t had the inclination or time to change code that works.

The communications library was originally used by a server-side Windows Service which was only used by a few users at a time, and its PUT or POST operations are rarely used.

Recently, we started to use the communication library in a new project where it is used in a multi-tenant server with many simultaneous users, and its PUT and POST operations are called much more often. This new usage made a memory leak much more significant than before.

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Jan 302014
 

In Denmark, the telephone operator TDC provides voice over IP subscriptions to business customers using the Broadworks platform by Broadsoft. The call the product TDC Scale or TDC One depending on the subscription type.

Broadworks has the ability to create voice response menus, hunt groups (they call them call centers), and other nice stuff to manage calls to and from the company.

I had a bit of a problem figuring out which file format to use when uploading voice prompts to the IVR and message boxes.

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Jan 242014
 

My company is an Exchange shop – amongst other things, we develop software that integrate with Exchange server for calendar synchronization purposes.

As we “eat our own dog food” – or “drink our own champagne” if you will – we run Exchange server. We are a small shop, so we only have one server, with no redundancy etc.

In case of server downtime, we need a backup MX hosted somewhere other than our datacenter, so incoming mail isn’t lost while the Exchange server is down.

We used to have a VM with a traditional hosting provider, but that setup became too complicated (the “best” way for us to pay them was with Paypal, and there were problems with them not being able to verify our VAT number after we were merged with our parent company).

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May 032013
 

I can’t believe its already been three years since I installed our first Lync 2010 edge server, but the certificate expiry is in the near future, so the time has passed quickly.

The documentation for the certificate request, generation and assignment was flaky, so I had to dig deep in my mind to drag out what to do when installing a certificate in Lync, especially the Lync edge server. If you are also having problems remembering what to do, or you have never tried it before, then this blog post is for you.

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Mar 082013
 

After the Lync 2013 upgrade I made at my company in December, we have been having problems with multiparty IM and voice calls, as well as with the Lync whiteboard feature and other stuff.

We develop software that integrates with Lync (http://www.blueposition.com/lync and http://www.busylight.com/), so our production Lync installation should really be working properly, but I haven’t had the time to look into the problem in details, and no amount of googling the error messages helped.

Today however, my colleague had to debug a problem to one of our software products, that only occurred when the user was in a voice conference, so the Lync issue had to be solved – otherwise he had no way of reproducing the software problem.

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Mar 082013
 

I recently installed the monitoring database for my company Lync Server 2013 infrastructure.

Following the guide at http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/jj205271.aspx was straight forward, but as often happens, something went wrong.

When it wanted to create the SQL server database, the topology publish process failed with an error message: “The network path was not found”.

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Feb 052013
 

If you need to debug Lync Server 2013 on Windows Server 2012, you are best of running it on a full server UI (not Server Core or the minimal UI).

I have experienced that without it, the Snooper tool won’t be able to show you a parsed view of the log files, only the raw logs.

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